Carole Leslie

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6 Steps to a successful employee buyout

August 4, 2014

1. Be clear about your own needs and intentions
As an exit route, the sale to employees is the option that gives the vendor the greatest control over the process. You can set the timescales, choose the structure, decide on how much you want and even influence how the company will look once you have said goodbye.
It can be very worthwhile to talk through your ideas with someone who understands the process. Talk to former owners and companies who have already taken this route. The more research in the beginning, the smoother the transition later.

2. Choose the right adviser
Although research proves that employee ownership is a very successful business model, it is not yet a mainstream ownership structure. It’s therefore important that you select an adviser who understands what you want to achieve, and knows how to help you get there. You don’t want to be paying for someone learning how to do it, or someone who doesn’t know how to get the best possible outcome

3. Select the structure that’s right for you
There is no “one size fits all” employee ownership structure, and the best one for your company is one that fits with your organisation, your people and your culture. For example, in the UK’s largest employee owned company, John Lewis Partnership, employees do not have an individual shareholding. The shares are held in trust on behalf of the employees. This is a popular model. In other companies, employees can buy and sell shares and build up value in the company in which they work. There are tax effective ways to facilitate employee share ownership.
It may be that a family business may want to retain a small shareholding for future generations or the company may want to make a small number of shares available for external investors. It’s important to invest time in considering all options, and the potential consequences of these options. Consider this early in the process in order that you reach the best ownership model for you.

4. Design the appropriate funding package
The owner who has created and built a successful business should be able to benefit from a fair price when it comes time to sell that business. The funding of the employee buy-out must be structured in order to achieve the fair price, yet not place an undue burden of debt on the company and its employees. It might be that a “package of funding” is the best solution; using company cash reserves, employee investment and external and vendor financing. If possible, it makes sense to do this in the most tax effective way.

5. Manage the change
Despite what some lawyers might like you to believe, a business transfer is not just a legal process. Yes, it is of critical importance to take appropriate advice and to have the correct documentation in place but as an organisational change this requires a broader approach. The employees of the company will become the owners, and to fulfil this role they must have a proper understanding of the rights and responsibilities involved in ownership. Pulling together the different strands; funding, structuring, share transfer, communication, stakeholder management as well as keeping the day job going is a tall order.

6. Communicate, communicate, communicate!
Communication is the lynchpin of the process. The key to success in employee owned companies is when the employees think, feel and act like owners. By involving your employees in shaping the company for the future, gaining a real understanding of the rights and responsibilities of ownership, you can ensure that the employees will be as committed to business success as true owners.
Customers are positive about dealing with employee owned businesses and companies owned by their employees fnd it easier to recruit and retain high calibre staff. Leverage your employee ownership to raise awareness outside of the company
The move to employee ownership presents a tremendous PR opportunity. Make sure your PR people understand what it means,

Of course, communication never stops within the employee-owned business. Many companies describe employee ownership as a journey. You will find the employee ownership community to be one where people share knowledge and experience generously. There is a genuine commitment to ethical working and best practice; driving successful, sustainable business which benefits the individual, the company, the community and the economy.

Posted in: Employee owned business, General
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