Carole Leslie

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  1. It’s not all about the numbers!

    June 10, 2014

    “Exit is rarely a purely economic decision for a business.” – Michael Kelly, Senior Associate, Macroberts

    I was invited to attend “The Deal”; a workshop looking at business transfer, facilitated by leading law firm Macroberts. Having worked on many transactions, all of them employee buy-outs, I was intrigued to find out how more conventional exits differ. Attendees were a mix of owners of owner managed firms, and business advisers. We were split into two groups and given a transaction to work on. One group was to look at this from the perspective of vendor, and my group was to take the role of purchaser. David Wylie, Corporate Partner, led the workshop by setting the scene. We were given some outline facts, but not much in the way of financial information. This made the accountants in my team a tad nervous: “We need to see the numbers”! Michael Kelly, Senior Associate, who facilitated our group, was clear. “You have to use the information you have. Exit is rarely a purely economic decision for a business”.

    It was a family business. Sound, profitable, good prospects. One of my group identified a winning tactic. “Let’s buy out their major supplier – that gives us some leverage.” This move almost broke the deal. The vendor team perceived this to be an underhand manoeuvre that would lead to breakdown in trust. Indeed, one of their number wanted to walk away then.

    Some of those present felt this was taking “role play” too far, but in my experience, this can be exactly what happens. The vendor has to feel comfortable with the sale. This is particularly salient in a privately held business, where often a chunk of life and legacy is being sold, not just what appears on the balance sheet.

    What did I learn? Lots! I didn’t know that patents were geographic (thanks, Euan Duncan) and was very interested to hear from employment specialist John McMillan how employment issues differ with an asset sale rather than a share sale. Ainsley McLaren, tax specialist, was on hand to guide us through the minefield of taxation issues.

    The most salient learning point from the workshop reinforced what I’d found in deals I’d worked on; the key factor in a business transfer is the people. Yes, price is important. The vendor has to be happy they are getting their earned reward for starting or building up the business. However, there are other factors at play. What are the aspirations of the current management team? What do the shareholders really want to achieve from the deal? Who makes the business successful? What’s the outlook in that sector? What are the real- tangible and intangible – assets in the business? It’s about more than the numbers.

    Macroberts have a winning formula in this workshop. You learn so much from working through the theoretical case study. You get the opportunity to explore issues that might not be immediately obvious, and experts guide you on the potential consequences of any actions and decisions. Selling a business can be a complex transaction whatever the circumstances. The workshops run throughout the year and if any business owner is considering a sale over the next few years, I’d certainly recommend attending. And great to see selling to employees is an option considered!

    For information on Macroberts Deal workshops click here